THE RIOT POINT

The Lab

The fruits of riotous experimentation.

Lost in translation: convert prospects into customers

If you want someone to do something--your words have to work

To convert prospects into customers or to align your organisation you have to do three things:

  1. Learn the language of your target audience.
  2. Use it. 
  3. Check that you’ve used it properly.

Don’t get lost in 'Translation.'

Iwan JenkinsComment
Forget logic. It's emotion which kicks off action

George knows that logic stimulates thought, but it's emotion that jump-starts action.

Well he didn't, but he does now.

He is in his mid-50’s and by any measure, especially a tape measure, he is successful. 

He displays the fruits of his success around his waistline and gives proof to the saying, travel broadens the behind—especially if you’re doing it in business class.

George resolved to keep success on his bottom line, and not his bottom.

“I have to go to the gym,” he said, “but though I can rise an hour before dawn to visit a customer, the thought of pumping out press-ups at 06:00 leaves me stone cold.”

You see, for all the logic on the benefits of exercise, it didn’t put enough fuel in Georges tank to get him lifting barbells while the sparrows were still sleeping.

What happened next? Listen to Riot Point Radio to find out...

Iwan Jenkins
"Live a life filled with fun and purpose." Colonel Donald Pudney

If your house lights dimmed unexpectedly this morning, or if your car stalled without apparent reason, don’t worry. It was a one off.

The Universe endured a sudden negative energy spike as a force of nature transferred from one dimension to another.

Colonel Donald Pudney has left the earthly parade ground for the last time.

Simon LuntComment
Concerned your poor strategic thinking will be exposed? Time to write a book.

Wool-suited, french-cuffed and tied (at that time), executives can sit cooly for hours in 40C heat but don’t ever extinguish the projector. Nothing brings on a perspiratory flash-flood faster than the prospect of delivering a slide-less presentation. 

An executive should be able to communicate her or his strategy in 10 mins or less. They should be able to do so engagingly and with clarity. 

Any Executive who cannot do this surrenders their right to admonish sub-ordinates who are similarly fuzzy in their communication of the strategy.

Can’t past the test? Fortunately a remedy is at hand.

Get the profits and avoid the perils of digital marketing: an (almost) free workshop

If you're in the Greater Toronto Area on Tuesday 6th December join Rosalina and me at an (almost) free workshop on the strategic aspects of digital marketing.

Done properly, digital marketing can give you very loyal, high quality customers. Loyal, high-quality customers lead to loyal, high-quality gross margins.

But digital marketing abounds with sink holes and pit-falls. 

This workshop focuses on getting profits and avoiding perils. It will introduce digital marketing to strategic decision-makers, not tacticians.

Simon LuntComment
Executives have to go where the rubber hits the road

Here’s the take away for Executives.

Despite your best endeavours, you may have 'defeat devices' installed in your organisation. To ensure this is not the case, you have to engage the source data.

What does this mean?

  • Even if your Net Promotor Score is a whopping 80%, you, personally, should still verify the data by engaging with customers.
  • Even if your employee engagement surveys tell you things couldn’t be better, you still need to confirm this by walking, talking and listening.
Simon LuntComment
O Brother (Steve Jobs) where art thou?

It’s official. Tim Cook has stepped out of Steve Jobs’ shadow. 

Under his watch (no pun intended), the stock price has doubled, market capitalisation has gone from ~ $300bn to $660bn, and contribution of revenues from subscription services has boomed. 

Cook filled a big pair of shoes—and now he’s using them to walk to a destination far from Apple’s roots.

But at what price?

Apple is about to lose it's key competitive advantage: making us creators and communicators

What did the Ancient Greeks ever do for us? Quite a lot it seems.

The Ancients knew a thing or two about Strategy. 

The early Greeks viewed life as a voyage in which you would head in a general direction. Constantly navigating between Cosmos and Chaos—Order and Disorder with the realisation that winds from both sides could provide useful momentum. But sailing too close to the craggy shoreline of either extreme would lead to destruction. 

Contrast this with the modern, titanic, corporate warriors. Insulated out of necessity (internal meetings, financial reviews, presentations to analysts, fear of bad customer feedback), they delegate strategy to staff who, with finger-crossed confidence, report that every future has been anticipated, every contingency planned. This well engineered business will withstand any iceberg. Nothing left to chance. 

Or so they believe. It usually ends in tears—or an unfriendly take-over.

So what can we learn?

At last—A Human's Guide to Leadership™

You have to lead to succeed.

In an increasingly complex world no individual can solve every problem. In response we form teams, organisations, and even nations. Each of these needs successful, not perfect, leaders.

And here is the challenge. 

How can we become successful leaders when humans have no manual? 

Answer.

  • By working with the grain of human nature, not against it.
  • By utilising our collective strengths instead of wasting energy on backfilling our weaknesses. 
Simon LuntComment
How to remove the pain and add the profit into Employee Engagement

Executives tell me, in their more candid moments, that they doubt the value of the ‘employee engagement survey.’

They find it time-consuming and stressful, and most have all but given up on trying to calculate any return-on-investment. No wonder then such surveys have the reputation of being “all pain and no profit.” 

So why bother? The answer lies in why we form organisations.

Is the glass half empty or half frozen?

-25'C flashing on the car dashboard always heralds is a fresh start to the day, but the cool temperature didn’t deter the hardy souls I saw jogging as I drove out for my morning coffee.

Yet, if the comments of dial-in listeners on the morning news show where representative of city, a visitor would take Torontonians as feeble-minded as well as feeble-bodied.

 Enough. This is winter. This is Canada.

You see, when it comes down to it, we can deal with these parky conditions in one of three ways:

  1. Complain. Wish things were different but do nothing about it.
  2. Ignore. Insulate yourself from current conditions and carry on in isolation.
  3. Embrace. Modify your actions to make the most of the environment, and change as it changes.